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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
collaboration, communes case and experience of all of members of our community, teachers, law enforcement, and the affected families will work to make our schools safer, stronger, and more united. that's why we're here today to prevent another sandy hook. we all have to work together to end gun violence. i hope we can continue that conversation today and make our children safer. thank you. >> i would like to thank our leader and co-chair for this honor. we come to this room today from different places and many different backgrounds. the last few months we have seen too many of our fellow countrymen gunned down in the streets. i represent camden, new jersey. a city of 80,000 have had 70 homicides this year. we see our neighbors die in shopping malls, movie theaters, college campuses and horrifically 31 days ago an elementary school. we are bonded together by one common conviction and that is our belief that is not inevitable. we can make choices to stop this from happening again. we believe that consistent with good medical practice, we can improve our mental health system so those who are
oath of office. our witnesses hail from every walk of life, education, academia, law enforcement, and public service. we are stroorl grateful to have with us, dr. janet robinson, superintendent of schools of newtown, connecticut. dr. emily nottingham, mother of gabe zimmerman, all of you may know was the victim in tucson nearly two years ago. chief scott knight, police department from minnesota to give us a school from middle america, from rural areas. and mayor michael nutter, president of the u.s. conference of mayors who has been a leader on this issue for a very long time. your voices and your contributions are playing a critical role in our effort to take these long overdue actions. we look forward to hearing your ideas and testimony and answering the call to action on gun violence prevention. we are especially pleased to be doing so on a day when our president, as we continue to mourn with the families of newtown, has told us that the time for action is now. we must do everything in our power to stop such terrifying violence in the future. we recognize these challenges are
to discuss ways to prevent gun violence. later, bob goodlatte talks about his opposition to new gun laws. >> president obama launched his effort to reduce gun violence wednesday, calling for action and don't congress and signed in 23 consecutive quarters to deal with the issue. speaking before an audience that included the families of those killed in last month's newtown shooting, the president called for an assault weapons ban, better background checks, and more funding for police and mental health services. this is 25 minutes. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president and vice-president of the united states. >> please, please be seated. thank you. before -- before i begin today, let me say to the families of the innocence that died, our hearts go out to you and you incredible courage being here and the president and i will do everything in our power to honor the memory of your children and your wives with the work we take up here today. it's been 33 days since the nation's heart was broken by the horrific, senseless violence that took place at sandy hook elementary school. 20 -- 20 beauti
organic law. and saying that the constitution could not possibly have anticipated our every governing question. i invite you to imagine if you will, just close your eyes and just imagine the right wing outcry. if president obama called the constitution organic law. instead of saying this. liberals have always understood that, they understood it when president lincoln said it and when president obama said it. but conservatives have never, ever understood that when times change, so must we. and the day conservatives actually do understand that, they will no longer be conservatives. >>> obama land. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. yesterday we discovered the obama doctrine. put simply, it's to continue the american revolution well into the 21st century. defined economic equality for women, full equality all out for gay people. and full political and financial opportunity for people of color. everything about yesterday screamed with this manifesto from the makeup of the crowd to the people in the inaugural platf
anyone else under the law, for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. >> there's grievance there, not just rights. people waiting in line. i said this before, i was lucky to be there when south africans first got the vote, all south africans, and they waited for four or five hours, and i thought that was unbelievable. and then to watch people in america, in this advanced society of democracy, having to wait eight hours. it looked like a punitive action by republicans, to be blunt about it, from state legislatures and big capital cities that decided, you know what? let's make it hard for these people. maybe we can cut down that vote. >> that's one of those great underr
, megan's law and the man who tortured and killed her, his parents tried to get help for him and they couldn't. and a lot of this goes back to the 1980's, when we looked at rights for the mentally ill and i believe they should have rights to refuse treatment, but if you suffer from an illness -- i'll give you example, most of the mentally ills do not pose a hazard to people but certain elements do. and you cannot make these people take their medication and then we shut down the institutions and put people out in the street for community care. and these are the types of people that when they get into delusions, they are not going to come in and seek that care. so you have problems. you also have problems -- the school shooting in newtown is terrible, but i would like to know what went on in that home. what went on with mr. lanza and his mother? there's not enough information out there yet. and we're going off proposing this ban and that ban and whatever, all i see is that mental illness and care for the mentally ill seems to be getting short changed. the other point i'm concer
be an entrepreneur. passing so many laws and regulations and taxes that they kill the start up businesses in ways that are crazy. >> i have to jump in. thank you so much for talking about entrepreneurship. you were there, you were a part of that. there has been so much destruction to the assistance program. talk about rules and regulations. those are things your administration, when you were the speaker of the house, so many of those types of rules and regulations were built into the program, so much that they have not responded to the recession. it is only able to reach about 30% of the children who are poor in this country. an incredible increase in child poverty been. micro finance would may be a great way to insert into the system. if a woman is receiving cash assistance or food stamps and she happens to, may be working on the side doing hair and nails, housekeeping, child care. fantastic things. that $50 or $100 she makes on the weekend, god forbid she reported to the case manager because she would be criminalized for something that would be celebrated in this country. [applause] >> i agree
to creating pro-growth tax law that will enable american companies to compete effectively against companies that are domicile in other countries around the world we need a level playing field. the united states has the highest corporate tax rate in the world. also the united states is one of the few countries in the world with a system that is called a global tax system rather than a territorial tax system. the 113th congress we are going to continue to advocate for comprehensive tax reform that broadens the base that reduces corporate tax rates and moves through a competitive territorial system. proctor and gamble pays income taxes and over 100 countries around the world. a business tax reform should provide a level playing field so that each business has the confidence of knowing it pays roughly the same amount of income tax as its competitors in markets with at home and abroad. in terms of deficit reduction, the obvious problem that must be addressed is the problem that currently the united states has been spending at a rate that far exceeds the rate of revenue that we are receiving. the
, law was less than that. that was a classic compromise that he did not get. another compromise was his promise to repeal the bush tax cuts for higher income. his goal was couples making more than 200th $50,000 or couples making $200,000 and the fiscal cliff deal did not achieve that. we rented that a compromise. let's go to fort lauderdale,. caller: with respect to not keeping a promise for negotiations with a health kicce -- i think that a somewhat wrong. i have watched the other representatives of congress on tv every day negotiating and debating and putting their facts together. the final decision between nancy pelosi and the head of the sun -- of the senate when they finally came out with exactly what the bill would be -- it was done behind closed doors. the putting together of the bills, people putting in their amendments, was actually done on cspan every day and i watched that. secondly, with respect to these people calling about taking away guns. there is nothing about taking away people's guns. if they go through a background check, they don't need to have a gun. the second ame
and work more together to pass the laws that need to be passed. that's all i have to say. host:jody cantor has a lengthy story of this morning on the front page of " the new york times." steve is joining us from with -- ridgway, pa., independent line, good morning. caller: one thing i have noticed since president obama has been president is the continual -- a concerted effort to compare himself to president lincoln, a first in his talking about the book that he was reading -- i cannot remember the title of it -- >> king of rivals? caller: now he is taking the inauguration on the lincoln bauble. there is an idea that some callers have made that this president has faced worst consequences or worse situations than previous presidents i think is somewhat absurd. the fact that he is half-black, there is nothing to it. he is the president of united states and is supposed to be president of everybody. unfortunately, i have lost confidence in the politicians in washington, d.c. and i think the people of the united states should continually boat these people out of office on a regular basis until t
go. >> what about external? i mean, i could cite all sorts of different laws in which criminal behavior could have actually been tracked, if this woman had ever asked for a penny from him for treatment. if she had ever asked or encouraged him to raise money. those are crimes. and that's something the police can get involved, and police can triangulate cell phone signals and go after i.p. addresses and find you in a nanosecond, oh where is all of that? >> it's coming. if not, outside private investigations as well. manti te'o just graduated. slated for a top ten draft pick. a $10 million to $20 million investment worth over $1 billion. they do due diligence on players who aren't involved in the most bizarre sports story of the last 25 years. you better believe they're going to dig up every last aspect of this young man's personal life to find out what he did and why he did it, and the story is only going to get more strange as we go down the rabbit hole, i believe. >> you know, i asked the famed sports, the legendary sports agent leigh steinberg in the last hour if this young ma
the country to oppose the white house effort to reform the nation's gun laws. at demonstrations in pennsylvania and ohio, gun owners pilloried calls for stricter gun control. >> no law put on law abiding citizens has ever deterred crime. they're going to take my gun so i can get shot. >> my thoughts is, tell the leftwing liberal idiots in washington to leave our guns alone. we're not hurting anything. it is the criminals. deal with the criminals, not the law abiding citizens. >> the pro-gun rallies also coincided with a series of nationwide gun shows where at least five people were wounded when their firearms accidentally went off. in north carolina, three people were injured when a shotgun accidentally fired as its owner removed it from its case. another gun owner accidentally shot himself in indianapolis, while an ohio a gun show attendee was injured by stray bullet. president obama is set to publicly take the oath of office today at his second term inauguration in washington. obama gathered with his family sunday in the blue room of the white house to privately recite the 35-
say this in the first inaugural address they would have booed him. "no organic law can ever be framed with the provision applicable to every situation. no foresight can anticipate nor any document of reasonable length contain express provisions for all possible questions. that is abraham lincoln calling the constitution organic law. and saying that the constitution could not possibly have anticipated our every governing question. i invite you to imagine if you will, just close your eyes and just imagine the right wing . . >>> welcome to "the ed show" from new york. the conservatives are whining about president obama's speech. it's just too liberal. i say welcome to the mainstream. let's get to work. >> it's morning again in america. >> the era of liberalism is back. >> the country is awake to the new center left america, and conservative elites can't stand it. >> the republican agenda in his mind props up white privilege. >> tonight katrina vanden heuvel on president obama and the official end of the reagan era. none of it means anything if the obama agenda can't get through the senat
: president obama, sworn in yesterday, promising to change the tax code, immigration laws, and act on climate change. good morning, everyone. we will spend the first part of this morning's "washington journal" on yesterday's inaugural address. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for independents, 202-585-3882. also, send us a tweet, twitter.com/c-spanwj. post your comments on facebook, or you can e-mail us. journal@c-span.org. let me begin this morning, this is "the wall street journal," had line. "obama vows aggressive agenda." "he is looking beyond the fiscal battle set to dominate the coming weeks." and then a side story, an analysis. "the president is set to fight over a new to do list." "the inauguration was not only grayer, he sounded less like a man ready for lofty flights and more ready for ground battles." and then here is "the washington post," this morning. there had lyme, "we must act." -- there had line, "we must act -- their headline, "we must act." "the new york times," this morning, "a limitless vision." "speech gives quiet goals center stage." "our jou
. he enacted into law. [applause] >> than a two-year anniversary of lilly ledbetter legislation. forward if women are in the congress and committee. we will have to deal with issues like the safety of our children. thank you for making this a part of your agenda. you will have to be dealing with the issue that relates to violence against women. we need to pass that legislation. we have to deal with jobs. i want to say a personal thanks. if we did not have some many women in the congress we never would have the first woman speaker of the house. you haven't seen that the net. having strength and numbers for women leading the way are helping to change the playing field. i promise you this. it increases the level of civility in politics. we will change the environment in which politics is being conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, and lee's list. we are emilie, and we ain't seen nothing -- -- thank you, emily's list. seene emilie, and we ain't nothing yet. >> are you emilie? --emily? -- emily? >> hello. i am
pretty much. he went to the best schools in the country, columbia and on to harvard law. he becomes editor of the harvard law review in a blind test. nobody knew -- there's no affirmative action here. blind test. you were the guy that had the best writings, the best research, the best scholarship to get the job. and then he comes back and instead of being a money grubber on wall street, excuse me money grubbers on wall street, he decides he's going to do something for his community where he came from. and then he runs for office, gets beaten by bobby rush and then he gets in a car and drives out to the burbs and lets them decide. >> michelle obama did the same thing. she resented princeton a lot when she got there but she channeled her resentment in a paper about the history of african-american women. the fact they worked within the system given the challenges that they had to have gotten to this place and to be the calming influence that they are i think is remarkable. >> calming, mosh care calm than. >> low bar. low bar. but with an inner fire though. you know -- . >> they proved
having arrived at the platform, greeting both of his daughters and his wife and mother-in-law. you see behind him, there is vice president biden, chuck schumer, chair of the inaugural committee is the first person we'll hear from and call proceedings to order. and then it unfolds like the greatest graduation ceremony ever. >> rachel, there's a moment when the new president takes over, like when reagan took over from carter, when the chief of secret service walks behind one guy to the other guy, it is pretty creepy. it is pretty creepy when you're the guy losing protection, but nicely enough, it will be the same guy there. >> jerry ford was the first president who upon leaving office from the inauguration of the new president, jimmy carter, decided to leave by helicopter, seen as a rather odd way to leave on the way, but every president has followed that tradition. it is a dramatic way to get out of dodge. also your last ride in marine one. >> you want to allow the indulgence just a bit. >> one of the things as yet undetermined for the second term is who exactly will make up the preside
the implementation of the health care law which, of course, hasn't really fully taken effect. he's got energy and climate which is really the big undone story from the first term. he did not get that cap and trade bill. and he's not going to get it which means he's going to have to turn to regulatory executive authority to try to achieve some goals there. and then because of newtown and events that have happened during his presidency, he has seen his agenda change to focus on gun control, an issue that democrats had shied away from. and he's just laid out an agenda which is going to be difficult to achieve. that's why he's also trying to use the executive authority as much as he can. >> how much is -- how much time is there overall to achieve an agenda, especially in the second term? is it limited to two years? >> it's not as much as you think. yes, the term is four years, but really what you're looking at is through the 2013 midterm elections and even a little bit less time than that. once you get to the summer of 2014, members of congress are going to be looking to their own re-elections. t
new laws to protect the privacy of people who report crimes. savannah? >> kerry sanders, thank you. >>> highlights of president obama's second inaugural, beyonce's starring rendition of the star spangled banner. was she actually singing it live? stephanie gosk has more on that. >> u.s. marine corps put out a statement saying that no one in the marine band is in a position to assess whether the performance was live or not. the star did rely on a prerecording and the band wasn't actually playing either. by the time beyonce got to the rockets red glare ♪ and the rockets red glare >> there was no doubt she was nailing the national anthem. but the nation, the president and the world watching and listening. ♪ the brave >> now there are doubts that she pulled off the flawless live performance everyone thought she did. >> i don't know about you. i'm always so relieve when they hit it out of the park. that is a hard song to sing. >> reporter: the head of the marine corps band tells nbc news her voice was prerecorded and so was the band. to be fair, it was still beyonce's voice and no on
that are not authorized by law. number six, congress routinely raise the social security trust fund to cover general revenue shortfalls. >> guest: if you look at the appropriation bills come which have not been on the last two years because of the political dynamic going on and you go when they were put in x amount of money and look at how many programs, it's over $350 billion now. programs that are funded that are not authorized by the congress. which tells you there's an imbalance in congress is heavily appropriate funds for a program we haven't said we should be spending money on any toes see you the power of the appropriations committees in the power of pork or benefit to the states. what's most important? is the most important to look at an oklahoma at the amount of money i can direct their? or is it more important to think of the long run, with the help of our country in the long run and how do we make this type decisions? politically puts you on the losing side of every argument, that you work hard to explain yourself. poster number seven, members of congress don't have the opportunity to rea
the differences between the two bills and congress can pass a comprehensive bill for me to sign into law. america needs to conduct this debate on immigration on reason, and a respectful tone. all this need to keep some things in mind. we cannot build united country by inciting people to anger, or exploiting the issue of immigration for political gain. real lives will be affected by our debates and decisions. every human being has dignity and value, no matter what their citizenship papers say. host: you hear what the president said six years ago. a couple of campaigns have been held since then. most noticeably what mitt romney did and did not get in 2012. guest: there is a sense that the election returns have consequences. it is transparently in the self interest of republicans, who increased their share of the vote among the fastest growing block of american voters, latino voters. it is certainly much more favorable to immigration reform than when he made that speech six years ago. host: that is one of the issues the president will be facing. "the washington post" has this piece. one sentence i w
they have policies on everything from gay rights to voter id laws and those not in mathemati mathematics? >> is there a sense inside the republican party, in -- among leadership? you have to wonder that something measurable needs to change. i actually want to bring up this thomas edsal "new york times" piece which i thought was one of the best analyses i have read about whether republicans can change. he writes, "the problems that faces business leaders pressing for reform is not just the reluctance of a political party to change. instead, it is the fact that much of the republican electorate, as presently constructed is profoundly committed, morally and idealogically, to traditional values." you're asking groups of people to change who were brought together by their resistance to change. their opposition to change is why they are republicans, and oh, lo and behold, another man who has suffered several hours on a terrible ride up to new york city, the washington post's jonathan kaphart. >> it wasn't bad until we started rolling. >> unfortunately it was a slow roll. in terms of that notio
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)